Viva Declaration! live in Morecambe 18th June

Viva Declaration! uses global jazz music with live mixed video to evocatively place human rights as fundamental principles able to lever movements against structural racism and global inequality, both of which have become highlighted during the pandemic era and which underpin issues of migrant justice.  Created and performed by film and digital media artist Kooj Chuhan and multi-instrumentalist composer Tagné Tebu, with guest musician the saxophonist-flautist Helena Summerfield. Viva Declaration! live in Morecambe focuses on the story of migration from ancient history to the present day. Plus a Q+A after the show with the artists and Gisela Renolds and Zia Khan from Global Link.

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Making Climate Connections

Can words, pictures and social media empower people to protect our environment?
A project exploring some ways in which local libraries, communities and artists in Oldham and Bremen are making climate connections using educative methods and creative media.

Making Climate Connections

An online event Weds 19th May, 6.30pm (UK) / 7.30pm (Germany)

  • Announcing the winning entries from the Climate Connections competition
  • Presenting the work produced by diverse groups in Oldham (UK) and Bremen (Germany) in the first phase of the Climate Connections project

How do local people relate to and voice their feelings about climate change? Can this expression combine with social media to have some impact on climate change? This event brings together artists, activists, libraries and community members to explore these questions. If you are interested in communities and climate change, also the arts and social media, then this informal sharing event is for you.

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Opportunity for Manchester anti-racism and social justice advocates to influence our public spaces

An inspiring panel of speakers including journalist Gary Younge, Historians Hakim Adi and Alan Rice, and youth worker Kerin Morris will present their views on Manchester’s current review of statues, monuments and other items. Among the many groups this is relevant to, it will be of particular interest for those engaged in Manchester anti-racism efforts. The registration link to attend these online public discussion events is www.manchesterpublicrealm.eventbrite.co.uk .

Panel of speakers on items in public spaces of special interest to Manchester anti-racism advocates

Manchester residents are encouraged to democratically influence how people, movements and events are represented in their public spaces in a once in a lifetime consultation. If you are a concerned citizen, get involved and complete the survey before 22nd March at www.manchester.gov.uk/publicspaces .

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Climate Change, Migration and DR Congo

How does climate change affect DR Congo and the chain of migration, what is the colonial context for this and what does it mean for how both People Of Colour and Europeans understand Climate Change and Justice? The video recording of the discussion that took place on 12 November 2020 is now available to view.

Video still from Climate Change, Migration and DR Congo
Alex Randall, Emmanuela Yogolelo and Kooj Chuhan (chair) online in discussion

The People’s History Museum (PHM) has a series of monthly ‘Radical Late’ sessions at 6pm, the November 2020 event was dedicated to the subject of Climate Change, Migration and DR Congo. Led by artist-activist Kooj Chuhan the online session included thought-provoking discussions with researcher-writer Alex Randall along with Emmanuela Yogolelo about the ways in which colonialism, conflict, race and migration connect with climate change, the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DR Congo) and people arriving from there to the UK. The evening also included a pre-recorded performance by Samuella Ganda from Amani Creatives.

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Climate Migration and DR Congo – where do we go?

A thought provoking discussion exploring the topic of Climate Migration and DR Congo, illustrated with music performed online. An event exploring the ways in which colonialism, conflict, race and migration connect with climate change, the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DR Congo) and people arriving from there to the UK.

Thursday 12 November 2020, 6pm – 8pm (GMT)

Image of deforestation - Climate Migration and DR Congo

How does climate change affect DR Congo and the chain of migration, what is the colonial context for this and what does it mean for how both People Of Colour and Europeans understand Climate Change / Justice?

The first event involving Crossing Footprints since we have now just begun operation as a CIC, in collaboration with Amani Creatives and the Radical Lates programme of People’s History Museum (PHM). The event involves a brief performance by singer-songwriters Emmanuela Yogolelo and Samuella Ganda, and a key discussion with Kooj Chuhan from Crossing Footprints and Alex Randall from the Climate and Migration Coalition.

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Viva Declaration! counters post-Brexit threats against human rights

Title poster image for Viva Declaration

A new music and multimedia performance raises the bar against the anti-human rights and anti-migration agenda hoisted onto Brexit.  Viva Declaration! uses global jazz music with live mixed video to evocatively remind us of how important our human rights are.  Created and performed by film and digital media artist Kooj Chuhan and the multi-instrumentalist composer Tagné Tebu, it focuses on the story of migration from ancient history to the present day.

The live show takes place at the People’s History Museum (PHM) on Saturday 22nd February at 2pm to launch their year-long programme of activity around migration.  At the heart of the Viva Declaration! project is a strong message about human rights, that they are vital and that they should not be watered down.  This is the potential scenario now that we have left the EU as was recently asserted loud and clear by Boris Johnson’s new Attorney General, Suella Braverman.

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In Humanity: borders, detention, human rights

In Humanity art installation and exhibition

In Humanity art installation and exhibition
1st – 23rd February 2020
at People’s History Museum, Left Bank, Spinningfields, Manchester  M3 3ER

+ ARTISTS’ TALK AND GUIDED TOUR
by Kooj Chuhan @ 2pm on Saturday 1st Feb.

In Humanity asks how far do we treat people needing refuge in humanity and with care?  The UK is the only place in Europe with no time limit on detention.  Nearly 30,000 people are locked up each year most of whom are eventually released, this is a shameful civil rights abuse that cannot be ignored.

By artist and film-maker Kooj Chuhan in collaboration with These Walls Must Fall and Greater Manchester Immigration Aid Unit, including soundtrack fragments by musician and composer Tagné Tebu.  In Humanity is part of the Declaration project by Metaceptive. 

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Migration Justice event featuring Declaration performance

Respected activist Viraj Mendis, video and music artists Tagné+Kooj and playwright-poet Louise Wallwein MBE are on the bill at a unique event to support migration justice on 25th September 2019 in Manchester.

migration justice, rights and resistance feat. Declaration performance - at Partisan 25 Sept 2019

Justice, Rights and Resistance

at Partisan, 19 Cheetham Hill Road, Manchester M4 4FY
Doors open 6.30pm / event runs 7pm-9.30pm
Food and refreshments will be available to buy
Tickets £8 / £5 / Pay-what-you-can

>> Click HERE for Tickets <<

Greater Manchester Immigration Aid Unit (GMIAU) mark their 30th birthday with this event looking back over their 30 years of delivering Justice, Rights and Resistance. Among the performances, speakers and discussion the event will feature a special performance of ‘Declaration’ by Kooj Chuhan and Tagné Tebu. Combining live music and projected visuals, they have collaborated with GMIAU and These Walls Must Fall to create this emotive work (more info below).  The event will look back on successful campaigns against racist immigration policies and discuss future challenges in the continued fight for immigration justice.

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Poppy Retake at M-Shed Bristol 10th April-7th May

The Poppy Retake

 and other work exploring
Colonies, Militarism and WWI

At M Shed, Princes Wharf, Wapping Rd, Bristol BS1 4RN Tel:
0117 352 6600
From Weds 10th April until Tues 7th May 2019
Open Tuesday – Sunday and Bank Holiday Mondays 10am-5pm (closed on all other Mondays)
https://www.bristolmuseums.org.uk/m-shed/whats-on/the-poppy-retake-from-the-shadows-of-war-and-empire/

The Poppy Retake at M-Shed

It’s great that we are about to have The Poppy Retake at M-Shed Museum on show for a month as a part of the Commemoration, Conflict and Conscience festival – see https://everydaylivesinwar.herts.ac.uk/ccc/ . Special thanks to the Remembering the Real World War I group, and also Tony T at Sweet Patootee www.sweetpatootee.co.uk for inviting the work to be shown. More about The Poppy Retake at http://crossingfootprints.com/poppy-retake/ but here’s a quick summary:

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Cuts Of The Cloth dystopian play with projected visuals

Written by Hafsah Aneelah Bashir, directed by Nikki Mailer, with visual projections and sound design by Kooj Chuhan/Metaceptive Media. Produced by Outside The Frame Arts. Performed as a part of the PUSH festival at HOME Manchester on 18th and 19th January 2019 in Stage 1.

The following by James Varney from his review in Exeunt magazine describes what the play is about:

Cuts of the Cloth is science fiction. In an unspecified future, a Muslim woman is kept in a human museum, as a resource in a governmental programme for warning against the dangers of ‘Islamisation’, radicalism, ‘Islamist ideology’ and other vague but threatening-sounding words used to pigeonhole British Muslims. Hafsah Aneela Bashir plays a woman reduced to an exhibit number. In whatever ‘present’ we inhabit together, she is placid, as if wiped clean – calmly saluting peace like an automaton. As she recounts her stories, ostensibly of warning, we see the passionate, human woman she used to be. (…) And the sci-fi framing does what all good science fiction does; the real story is in the past, which is to say our present. Bashir’s protagonist is detained and searched at border control, her students are investigated for having conversations which are too political.”

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